Facebook Traffic and Influence Jumps on Mobile Devices

Thanks to its efforts to slash ‘dark social’ links, Facebook’s measurable influence, especially on mobile, has skyrocketed.

Source: venturebeat.com

>”We all know Facebook is huge, and drives incredible amounts of traffic. But thanks to its recent efforts to uncloak the sources of content with no known referrer, we now know that the numbers are bigger than anyone believed.

According to a report issued today by Bitly, the world’s leading link shortener, Facebook has largely solved the problem of so-called “dark social” links — those that have no referrer data and can’t be measured by web analytics tools — and as a result, the social network’s influence skyrocketed during the fourth quarter.

In the report, Bitly wrote that Facebook’s influence jumped 8.6 percent during the fourth quarter overall and 30.2 percent on mobile. That doesn’t mean Facebook’s influence actually grew that much — it means that clicks formerly attributed to “dark social” are now being correctly counted as Facebook’s clicks. Given that Facebook’s major push in recent quarters has been to expand its reach on mobile and give its marketing partners more ways to monetize their content, this is solid evidence that strategy is working.

“Everybody knows Facebook is big, and everyone knows Facebook is driving a significant volume of traffic,” Bitly CEO Mark Josephson told VentureBeat. “But in Q4, they solved a significant part of dark social — traffic or referrers that marketers or publishers don’t know where it’s coming from. … Facebook is bigger than people think they are.”

Bitly’s in a position to know of what it speaks. The company shortens 600 million links a month that generate 8 billion clicks from a billion users worldwide. […]

But those radical drops in dark social links are reflected in Bitly’s latest data showing the strength of Facebook’s overall influence — and that its users are quickly moving from the desktop to mobile. While its influence on mobile exploded 30.2 percent, links coming from the Facebook on the desktop were down 19.8 percent in the fourth quarter.

Others have noticed similar drops in dark social links. Last month, Chartbeat, a service that measures web sites’ traffic, noted a substantial drop in links with no referrers, especially on mobile.

Last week, Facebook reported its fourth quarter earnings, and said that of its 1.39 billion monthly active users, 1.19 billion used the company’s mobile tools, up 26 percent from the same time a year ago. […]”<

More informati

See on Scoop.itSocial Media, Bitcoin & Finance

Advertisements

Vin Diesel: Facebook Owes Me Billions For Social Media Tips

See on Scoop.itTwitter & Social Media

Vin Diesel has a simple message for Facebook: You guys owe me big.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

>Vin Diesel told Entertainment Weekly: “(They asked me) to come up to their office to explain what the f— I was doing, and why I had so many fans … Facebook really owes me billions of dollars … But whatever.”<

See on www.inquisitr.com

How To Triple Your Success Using #SocialMedia #Advertising Platforms | #Forbes

See on Scoop.itTwitter & Social Media

The following guest post is by Neal Rodriguez, an online marketer who has helped iconic brands such as The Nielsen Company, Adweek, AOL, and dozens more meet their business objectives using social media and the search engines.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

[…]

Last month, I delivered a presentation before some public relations professionals representing some of the biggest universities in the country. And when I suggested that they should consider using social ads to convince people to subscribe to their digital assets by Liking their pages on Facebook, or buying views on YouTube using their ad platform, many rejected the idea like I was passing them a plate of AIDS. Interestingly enough, Mr. Weintraub outlined some ways that public relations specialists or marketers assigned to acquire publicity can use social advertisements to target journalists, writers or reporters based on how they classify themselves and post their professional titles as an interest. He simply instructs his readers to target Facebook ads by listing keywords, such as blogger, editor-n-chief, correspondent, news editor, writer, columnist, and dozens more in the interest field.

On social media or other advertising platforms, I always aim to advertise for life-time value; meaning, I like to advertise to acquire contact information and/or have people subscribe to my digital assets like a Facebook business page, or email list. This way I can keep subscribers abreast of everything I’m communicating or marketing. With an engaged following, you create an endless line of opportunities to recoup your investment in the advertising every time you publish new content. Moreover, now that everybody’s a “journalist,” with the immediate ability to tweet, post on Facebook, or launch an online publication with WordPress or other type of open source content management system, when something is worth citing, you’ll have an active user base of publishers that are likely to link to your content. I have also managed email lists to which writers of mainstream media outlets are subscribed; thus having them on board also increases the chance of securing publicity on iconic publications. Mr. Weintraub’s approach, however, allows you target journalists that are not subscribed to stay abreast of your content. He argues that since social advertisements look like organic posts, media stakeholders are more likely to simply click and cite the piece of content to which they’re exposed.

Mr. Weintraub will delve further into how brands can leverage Facebook and other forms of social advertising during his upcoming talk at Search Exchange, in Charlotte, North Carolina in July.

See on www.forbes.com

Klout and Kred Scores: Social Media, Politics and Influence – How it Works.

See on Scoop.itTwitter & Social Media

Metrics providers offer social media influence scores; here’s what you need to know about them.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

Do Social Scores Really Matter?

Unfortunately the answer is much more complicated than a simple yes or no. The majority of experts Government Technology spoke with said that, specifically in the public sector (versus the private sector), the social media influence scores of those who follow you tend to matter much more than your own scores. Why? Because others’ Klout and Kred scores can help you better identify whom in your constituency to respond to, as well as how best and how soon to engage with them. Social media influence scores essentially offer a shortcut to identifying, evaluating and engaging key influencers in your specific sector.

For example, someone with high Klout and Kred scores has a wide scope of influence online. What they say, post, share or tweet about your federal, state or local agency within their own and others’ social media networks has a higher potential to reach and impact others significantly more (and perhaps more meaningfully) than someone with low social media influence scores.

“If you are a government agency and you have someone yelling and screaming at you on Twitter or Facebook, or if someone just created a social media account simply to harass an agency, a social media manager or communications director could pick up on a person like that very quickly if they have both a low Klout score and low Kred scores,” said David Gerzof Richard, a social media and marketing professor at Emerson College in Boston and president of public relations and social media firm BIGfish.

“Conversely if you find people who have high Klout and Kred scores, and they really understand where your agency is going, and your agency’s goals, and they’re sharing your social media content, those people would especially be your super targets,” Richard said. “They’re the people you want to make sure are seeing your agency’s social media messaging and content, because they’re actively sharing it and they have a high rate of influence. What they share gets a lot of exposure and engagement, so it’s important to engage them.”

Examining your followers’ social media influence scores also helps to quickly, easily separate the “wheat from the chaff,” said Richard, enabling you to prioritize positive influencers and advocates over “noisy,” negative trolls and other disruptive followers.   Be Aware, but not too Concerned

“I think it’s a good practice for state and local governments to be aware of their social media metric scores, but I wouldn’t say they should necessarily be concerned about them, particularly on a day-to-day basis,” said Bill Greeves, CIO of Wake County, N.C., and co-author of Social Media in the Public Sector Field Guide.

See on www.govtech.com

How do you compare? New report reveals stats about social media usage in Canada

See on Scoop.itTwitter & Social Media

One in three anglophone Canadians says not a single day goes by without checking into their social media feeds.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

The report is based on telephone surveys with 4,001 anglophone Canadians in the fall and found almost seven in 10 Internet users declared they were regular social media users, logging on at least once a month. That figure was up by about six per cent compared to 2011.

Aimee Morrison:  “I think social media is hitting a tipping point in a way that cellphones did in the later part of the 1990s, where we’ve moved from the stage where it was something that the early adopters did and then the hipsters did and then the kids did.”

Facebook remains far and away the most popular social network. About 63 per cent of surveyed Internet users and 93 per cent of social media users said they’re on Facebook.  While Twitter gets a lot of media hype and is growing rapidly it’s not all that commonly used in Canada, according to MTM’s numbers.

Less than one in five Internet users surveyed said they were on Twitter in the last month, although those numbers had grown by 80 per cent in a year, up from just 10 per cent in 2011.

Read more: http://bit.ly/188PavD

See on www.ctvnews.ca

Sierra Club, utilities spar over Nebraska wind power

See on Scoop.itGreen & Sustainable News

The Sierra Club in Nebraska criticized the state’s public power utilities for failing to get more wind power online to compete with Iowa, which landed a planned data center for Facebook Inc. in Altoona and increased incentives for Google Inc. that allow it to expand in Council Bluffs.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

A Facebook spokesman confirmed in email to Midwest Energy News that access to wind power was a factor in its decision to locate in Iowa.

But John Boyd Jr., a New Jersey consultant who helps companies site data centers, told Midwest Energy News the demand for wind power was driven by marketing. “There’s public relations value above and beyond the economic value of wind energy,” Boyd said.

He acknowledged he doesn’t think wind power is the leading criteria for siting decisions. More important factors, he said, are tax incentives, real estate costs and the price of the electricity.  Altoona will provide a 20-year property tax exemption to Facebook, but the jobs must pay at least $23.12 per hour.

Data centers typically are extremely large buildings that house computer servers designed to store massive amounts of data. They typically create few jobs.

See on siouxcityjournal.com

Starbucks presses social media onward

See on Scoop.itTwitter & Social Media

Five employees manage Starbucks’ social media and, with 34 million fans, have developed the fifth-largest brand on Facebook.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

“Starbucks was holding Facebook promotions before most restaurants even figured out this was a space they needed to be in,” said Alicia Kelso, senior editor at Networld Media Group in Louisville, Ky., parent company of FastCasual.com and other online trade publications that track the restaurant business.

See on seattletimes.com

SEC Allows Companies To Announce News To Investors Through Facebook – AllFacebook

See on Scoop.itTwitter & Social Media

Soon, investors will be able to learn more about companies in the same space where they play Candy Crush Saga. The Securities and Exchange Commission declared Tuesday that companies can notify their investors of news through Facebook and Twitter.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

George Canellos, acting director of the SEC’s division of enforcement, commented on this new development in a press release:

One set of shareholders should not be able to get a jump on other shareholders just because the company is selectively disclosing important information. Most social media are perfectly suitable methods for communicating with investors, but not if the access is restricted or if investors don’t know that’s where they need to turn to get the latest news.

What brought about this decision was a post on the …

See on allfacebook.com