Why I did not upgrade to Windows 10

especial_windows_10_button-664x374

I am so happy to see those nag messages disappear from my computer, you know the ones reminding you that your period of time to upgrade to Windows 10 will expire on July 31?   Now that we are in August one less thing popping up that bothers me.

The question being do I upgrade or not?  And friends and family who look to me for advice on such issues want to know what I am doing and why.  Intuitively I felt that upgrading was unwise likely do to past experiences with O/S upgrades and backward compatibility of existing hardware and external devices.

Coolpix 995

For example, I own an older Nikon digital camera, Coolpix 995, which is a newer version of my first digital camera, a Coolpix 990.  Getting software that works for this camera for versions of Windows newer than XP has currently been a challenge.  Driver’s are not available for Windows Vista, 7 and definitely not for Window’s 10.  So such is likely for any devices I currently own.

Also, I like to buy used equipment at bargain prices.  I have learned through my own experience that electronic equipment has a short shelf life and prices drop quickly as newer versions of equipment enter the market.  By creating obsolescence in software, hardware becomes prematurely unusable due to compatibility issues.  When this occurs the current solution is usually to discard the item and buy a new replacement.

HP8530W_Elitebook

Another thing besides compatibility and premature obsolescence is extra work and other unknown issues which will inevitably arise from the upgrade.  I have an ‘Elitebook’ HP 8530 W laptop computer with Window’s 7 for my business and personal use, which I purchased for a bargain on Ebay.  I have spent a lot of time setting it up to work properly, I have no need to upgrade the software.

Let someone else figure it all out, then maybe in a couple of years I will buy a more powerful model at a lower price with Windows 10 or the current version already installed.   So I did not upgrade, and I am okay with that.

 

 

 

Advertisements

Facebook Traffic and Influence Jumps on Mobile Devices

Thanks to its efforts to slash ‘dark social’ links, Facebook’s measurable influence, especially on mobile, has skyrocketed.

Source: venturebeat.com

>”We all know Facebook is huge, and drives incredible amounts of traffic. But thanks to its recent efforts to uncloak the sources of content with no known referrer, we now know that the numbers are bigger than anyone believed.

According to a report issued today by Bitly, the world’s leading link shortener, Facebook has largely solved the problem of so-called “dark social” links — those that have no referrer data and can’t be measured by web analytics tools — and as a result, the social network’s influence skyrocketed during the fourth quarter.

In the report, Bitly wrote that Facebook’s influence jumped 8.6 percent during the fourth quarter overall and 30.2 percent on mobile. That doesn’t mean Facebook’s influence actually grew that much — it means that clicks formerly attributed to “dark social” are now being correctly counted as Facebook’s clicks. Given that Facebook’s major push in recent quarters has been to expand its reach on mobile and give its marketing partners more ways to monetize their content, this is solid evidence that strategy is working.

“Everybody knows Facebook is big, and everyone knows Facebook is driving a significant volume of traffic,” Bitly CEO Mark Josephson told VentureBeat. “But in Q4, they solved a significant part of dark social — traffic or referrers that marketers or publishers don’t know where it’s coming from. … Facebook is bigger than people think they are.”

Bitly’s in a position to know of what it speaks. The company shortens 600 million links a month that generate 8 billion clicks from a billion users worldwide. […]

But those radical drops in dark social links are reflected in Bitly’s latest data showing the strength of Facebook’s overall influence — and that its users are quickly moving from the desktop to mobile. While its influence on mobile exploded 30.2 percent, links coming from the Facebook on the desktop were down 19.8 percent in the fourth quarter.

Others have noticed similar drops in dark social links. Last month, Chartbeat, a service that measures web sites’ traffic, noted a substantial drop in links with no referrers, especially on mobile.

Last week, Facebook reported its fourth quarter earnings, and said that of its 1.39 billion monthly active users, 1.19 billion used the company’s mobile tools, up 26 percent from the same time a year ago. […]”<

More informati

See on Scoop.itSocial Media, Bitcoin & Finance

Social Dellight: From social media presence to a social business

See on Scoop.itTwitter & Social Media

Dell is a social media pioneer, jumping in before the first tweet was ever sent. The man who spearheads their efforts, Richard Margetic tells B&T how to improve your brand’s presence.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

How are brands stumbling on social media?

From the very beginning we realised social was not a traditional marketing tool, and if you treat it as a broadcast medium you’re going to fail. So many brands continue to do that today, despite the fact the medium requires engagement and authenticity and organic communications which are two-way.

The core things companies need to know are whether people are talking about your brand, product or area, and, if that’s the case, you need to establish a presence in social media. […]

Another is curation. Right now there’s so much being generated you need a curator to make sure the amount of time you’re spending is used on things that are important to you. User curation with influential users, will become stronger too.

Then there’s individual social capital. For years people have been talking about influencers, but for us the direction is more along the lines of understanding a complete profile of an individual: his or her levels of expertise, areas of interest and, secondarily, his or her level of influence.

There’s too much grey stuff around understanding influence, but the data and signals generated by individuals will become more embedded across any social media campaign across the company.

See on www.bandt.com.au

New Study Shows 5 Factors Push Social Behavior and Not So-Called Influencers – Are Kred and Klout Wrong?

See on Scoop.itTwitter & Social Media

Social influence is driven by 5 factors: message type, message form, device, time, and user engagement, according to new research by Lucule Consulting. So are you still counting on finding people with high “influence scores?

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

Indexes like Klout and Kred that are trying to prop up that idea are desperately trying to retro-fit more and more sources of social data to keep, well, their cred intact.  But according to Pente they have the problem exactly backwards: it’s not the “influencer” who changes behavior, it’s much more about the message–and the recipient.

Their statistical analysis indicates that the influence score accounted for only 3% of the variation in response. […]

Instead, consumers are more prone to react positively if a relevant message is received in a certain format (“News you Can Use,” for example) at certain times of the day when the level of engagement with a particular device is optimal (smart phones during the day, tablets in the evenings.)

We want to leave the idea of “sender” as influence,” says Klepic. “The mere fact that someone sends a message is too simplistic in social media. Just cause a message goes out in the “ether” doesn’t mean it has any impact at all. It is just broadcast.”

See on socialmediatoday.com