Klout and Kred Scores: Social Media, Politics and Influence – How it Works.

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Metrics providers offer social media influence scores; here’s what you need to know about them.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

Do Social Scores Really Matter?

Unfortunately the answer is much more complicated than a simple yes or no. The majority of experts Government Technology spoke with said that, specifically in the public sector (versus the private sector), the social media influence scores of those who follow you tend to matter much more than your own scores. Why? Because others’ Klout and Kred scores can help you better identify whom in your constituency to respond to, as well as how best and how soon to engage with them. Social media influence scores essentially offer a shortcut to identifying, evaluating and engaging key influencers in your specific sector.

For example, someone with high Klout and Kred scores has a wide scope of influence online. What they say, post, share or tweet about your federal, state or local agency within their own and others’ social media networks has a higher potential to reach and impact others significantly more (and perhaps more meaningfully) than someone with low social media influence scores.

“If you are a government agency and you have someone yelling and screaming at you on Twitter or Facebook, or if someone just created a social media account simply to harass an agency, a social media manager or communications director could pick up on a person like that very quickly if they have both a low Klout score and low Kred scores,” said David Gerzof Richard, a social media and marketing professor at Emerson College in Boston and president of public relations and social media firm BIGfish.

“Conversely if you find people who have high Klout and Kred scores, and they really understand where your agency is going, and your agency’s goals, and they’re sharing your social media content, those people would especially be your super targets,” Richard said. “They’re the people you want to make sure are seeing your agency’s social media messaging and content, because they’re actively sharing it and they have a high rate of influence. What they share gets a lot of exposure and engagement, so it’s important to engage them.”

Examining your followers’ social media influence scores also helps to quickly, easily separate the “wheat from the chaff,” said Richard, enabling you to prioritize positive influencers and advocates over “noisy,” negative trolls and other disruptive followers.   Be Aware, but not too Concerned

“I think it’s a good practice for state and local governments to be aware of their social media metric scores, but I wouldn’t say they should necessarily be concerned about them, particularly on a day-to-day basis,” said Bill Greeves, CIO of Wake County, N.C., and co-author of Social Media in the Public Sector Field Guide.

See on www.govtech.com

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Social Dellight: From social media presence to a social business

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Dell is a social media pioneer, jumping in before the first tweet was ever sent. The man who spearheads their efforts, Richard Margetic tells B&T how to improve your brand’s presence.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

How are brands stumbling on social media?

From the very beginning we realised social was not a traditional marketing tool, and if you treat it as a broadcast medium you’re going to fail. So many brands continue to do that today, despite the fact the medium requires engagement and authenticity and organic communications which are two-way.

The core things companies need to know are whether people are talking about your brand, product or area, and, if that’s the case, you need to establish a presence in social media. […]

Another is curation. Right now there’s so much being generated you need a curator to make sure the amount of time you’re spending is used on things that are important to you. User curation with influential users, will become stronger too.

Then there’s individual social capital. For years people have been talking about influencers, but for us the direction is more along the lines of understanding a complete profile of an individual: his or her levels of expertise, areas of interest and, secondarily, his or her level of influence.

There’s too much grey stuff around understanding influence, but the data and signals generated by individuals will become more embedded across any social media campaign across the company.

See on www.bandt.com.au

New Study Shows 5 Factors Push Social Behavior and Not So-Called Influencers – Are Kred and Klout Wrong?

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Social influence is driven by 5 factors: message type, message form, device, time, and user engagement, according to new research by Lucule Consulting. So are you still counting on finding people with high “influence scores?

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

Indexes like Klout and Kred that are trying to prop up that idea are desperately trying to retro-fit more and more sources of social data to keep, well, their cred intact.  But according to Pente they have the problem exactly backwards: it’s not the “influencer” who changes behavior, it’s much more about the message–and the recipient.

Their statistical analysis indicates that the influence score accounted for only 3% of the variation in response. […]

Instead, consumers are more prone to react positively if a relevant message is received in a certain format (“News you Can Use,” for example) at certain times of the day when the level of engagement with a particular device is optimal (smart phones during the day, tablets in the evenings.)

We want to leave the idea of “sender” as influence,” says Klepic. “The mere fact that someone sends a message is too simplistic in social media. Just cause a message goes out in the “ether” doesn’t mean it has any impact at all. It is just broadcast.”

See on socialmediatoday.com