Google Gives San Francisco Free Wi-Fi in Public Places

“On Wednesday, San Franciscans were able to hook their gadgets up to free Wi-Fi that launched in 32 new public locations.”

Community Energy Storage Project Stalls

See on Scoop.itGreen & Sustainable News

Two years ago, AEP Ohio kicked off one of the largest community energy storage projects in the nation, funded in part by the U.S. Department of Energy. The pilot, however, did not go very far.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

>AEP and S&C, which was the vendor for the pilot, declined to speak specifically about the project and the shortcomings of the batteries, although the two will continue to work together on a much smaller scale.

Small scale is exactly where community energy storage is at. It’s not only the scale of the batteries that are small (compared to megawatt, grid-level storage), but also the scale of utility uptake. “We haven’t seen any mass deployment,” said Mike Edmonds, vice president of strategic solutions for S&C. “It’s a very young market.” Instead, utilities are dipping their toes in the water by testing just a few units.<

See on theenergycollective.com

Solar Energy and Community Projects

See on Scoop.itGreen & Sustainable News

What does it take to cook up a community solar project? A dash of crowdfunding, a pinch of grassroots outreach, and a generous helping of persistence. That’s the word from San Francisco nonprofits RE-volv and Everybody Solar.

See on theenergycollective.com

Utilities fear what they cannot control with community solar – PV-Tech

See on Scoop.itGreen Energy Technologies & Development

Utilities love solar. Or at least they love utility-scale solar, i.e. installations they can own or control through power purchase agreements.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

>”People like solar and the utility can play a really useful role in bringing solar into a community. But you do have to deal with some issues in terms of how to take advantage of the tax incentives. That can really change the cost of the programme. To take advantage of the tax code, the system has to be located on your property.

[…]

“We’ve seen some prices as low as 5c-6c per kWh once the tax depreciation and tax advantages have been taken by an entity that has that tax appetite. For those who are subscribing this is a resource for the future and many years out that would be a hedge.”

Ultimately, one of the biggest appeals of community solar is the value proposition and that does not always come down to the cheapest rate: communities want power sourced as locally as possible. Green pricing failed to gain mass appeal 10 years ago because consumers were being sold ‘clean power’ generated by wind two states away.<

See on www.pv-tech.org

Why Canada needs more community power | rabble.ca

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By Brian Iler Kirsten Iler Pro Bono

| April 25, 2013

Community power means locally owned renewable energy projects that are developed and controlled (entirely or in part) by people living in the community.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

Under the second round of Ontario’s Feed‑in Tariff program or FIT 2.0, established under the Green Energy Act, 2009, community power advocates succeeded in getting a 10 per cent set aside of the available power grid capacity, being 25 megawatts, for community‑controlled groups. A hard-won victory, and, again, a small step in the right policy direction.

With the close of the FIT application window in January 2013, the Ontario Power Authority has reportedly received about 80-megawatts worth of community‑based applications, or nearly four times the space on the grid that was set aside for communities under the program.

Current Canadian renewable energy policies fail to capitalize on the massive social potential of community power. Policies must be redesigned in order to give ordinary citizens more access to control and experience the benefits of the growth of the renewable energy sector. This should involve setting larger capacity set-asides for community groups, and offering incentives for community participation, such as tax deductible investments (e.g. RRSPs), which proved effective in Denmark. It could also require multinationals to invest part of their profits into community-owned wind power, as has been proposed in the United Kingdom.

See on rabble.ca

KW17 | IHS: Solar PV energy storage market to grow to USD 19 billion in 2017 – SolarServer

See on Scoop.itGreen Energy Technologies & Development

IHS Inc. (Englewood, Colorado, US) has released a new report which predicts that the market for energy storage to accompany solar photovoltaic (PV) generation will grow more than 100% annually to 7 GW in 2017, representing USD 19 billion in value.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

Due to the energy storage subsidy, IHS expects Germany to play a leading role, as it did in the larger PV industry. The company predicts that 70% of installed storage in 2013 will be located in Germany.

IHS expects that if the program proves successful, other nations will pass similar subsidies. …

Market for storage with utility-scale PV as well

IHS also expects that storage will be used in larger PV systems, as connection requirements for PV become increasingly demanding. The company forecasts that utility-scale PV with storage will grow to more than 2 GW annually by 2017, led by Asia and the Americas.

See on www.solarserver.com

Capital Power gives community funding to ACW Ontario Townships

See on Scoop.itGreen & Sustainable News

The K2 Wind Power project and the Township of Ashfield-Colborne-Wawanosh (ACW) executed a Community Benefits Fund Agreement (CBFA) and a Road Use Agreement on March 19, with respect to the proposed K2 Wind Power Project.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

As outlined in the CBFA, K2 Wind will provide an annual payment of approximately $700,000 to ACW. This payment is in addition to the yearly municipal property taxes the Project will pay. Funds from the CBFA can be directed towards community based initiatives such as community and protective services; education and job training programs; public recreation facilities; land steward initiatives; energy sustainability projects; and property tax relief for residents. ACW Township will have broad discretion in the use of these funds.

See on www.lucknowsentinel.com