Amager Resource Center Copenhagen, Designed by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)

The waste-to-energy plant in Copenhagen was selected as a citation winner in the 62nd Annual Progressive Architecture Awards.

Source: www.architectmagazine.com

“BIG won the competition for the 1.02 million-square-foot Amager Resource Center with this widely touted scheme, which promises to turn a waste-to-energy plant into a popular attraction. By integrating a ski slope into the roof and a rock-climbing wall up one face, the architects build upon the project’s location: a part of Copenhagen on the island of Amager that has become a destination for extreme sports enthusiasts, thanks to its parks, beaches, dunes, and a lagoon for kayaking and windsurfing.  At 100 meters tall, the center will be one of the city’s tallest landmarks when completed—and a striking example of building-as-landscape. Indeed, the client has taken to calling it the Amager Bakke, or Amager Hill.”

See on Scoop.itGreen Building Design – Architecture & Engineering

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WTE Power Plant Saves 1.3 Million GPD of Water Daily with Tertiary Water Treatment & Recycling

Covanta’s Delaware Valley energy-from-waste facility in Chester, Pennsylvania, has saved 1.3 million gallons a day from local water supplies by installing Ge…

Source: www.environmentalleader.com

>” […] The Chester facility generates up to 90 megawatts of clean energy from 3,510 tons per day of municipal solid waste. Previously, the plant used 1.3 MGD — or nearly 5 million liters a day — of municipal drinking water in its waste conversion process, costing the company thousands of dollars in daily water purchases.

To reduce facility operating expenses and the consumption of local water resources, Covanta Delaware Valley upgraded the facility by installing GE’s RePAK combination ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) system as a tertiary treatment package. The new system enabled the plant to reuse 1.3 MGD of treated discharge water from a nearby municipal wastewater treatment plant for the facility’s cooling tower.

GE installed two RePAK-450 trains, each producing 450 gallons per minute of purified water. As a result, Covanta Delaware Valley has eliminated the need to purchase 1.3 MGD of local drinking water a day, which results in a substantial financial savings in addition to the environmental benefits.

GE’s RePAK equipment was delivered in 2014, with commissioning taking place the same year, making Covanta Delaware Valley the first North American company to deploy GE’s RePAK technology.

Covanta chose a combined water treatment technology approach because the typical organic and dissolved mineral content of the wastewater requires additional treatment to be suitable for use as cooling tower makeup. RO was selected as the technology of choice, and UF was required as the pretreatment solution.

GE’s RePAK combined treatment system reduces the equipment footprint up to 35 percent as compared to separate UF and RO systems. By combining the UF and RO into a common frame with common controls and GE’s single (patent-pending) multi-functional process tank, GE also is able to reduce the capital costs and field installation expenses when compared to the use of separate UF system and RO systems with multiple process and cleaning tanks, the company says.”<

 

See on Scoop.itGreen Energy Technologies & Development

Waste to Energy – Incinerator Operations threaten Community recycling programs

See on Scoop.itGreen Building Design – Architecture & Engineering

Rise in number of plants burning waste may be disincentive to greener methods of disposal

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

>Experts said the use of incinerators had consequences for recycling as local authorities were forced to divert waste to feed the plants. “The choice to invest in thermal treatment can hold back recycling efforts,” Adam Baddeley, principal consultant at Eunomia, said. “At one level, the money invested in such plant simply isn’t available to put into building recycling plants or collection infrastructure. And once you’ve built an incinerator or gasifier, there’s a strong incentive to keep it fed with waste, even if that means keeping on collecting as ‘black bag’ rubbish, material that would be economically practicable to collect separately for recycling.”

Charmian Larke, technical adviser for Cornwall Waste Forum, which unsuccessfully opposed a large incinerator in the south-west, questioned the planning process that resulted in incinerators being approved. “Some of them [planning officers] have spent their entire careers trying to get this incinerator so they are wedded to the idea,” Larke said. “But if the council members understood how bad these contracts were, the officers would lose their jobs.”

Larke claimed that many of the incinerators were built in poorer areas. “There’s a feeling that people who are downtrodden have a harder time getting their act together to object, and hence it’s easier to place nasty things next to them.”<

See on www.theguardian.com

Waste Management’s Hidden Value Driver Doesn’t Stink – DailyFinance

See on Scoop.itGreen Energy Technologies & Development

One thing has plagued mankind from the very first man caves tens of thousands of years ago to the streets of modern day cities: waste. Where do you

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

>Waste Management has quietly become a leader in waste to energy (WtE) and landfill gas to energy (LGTE) technologies. […] The company, using various sources of waste as feedstock, generates up to 550 MW of renewable energy each year – enough to power almost 1.2 million homes. Internal goals call for increasing that figure to 915 MW (2 million homes) by the end of the decade.

Waste to energy

Waste Management’s waste to energy services ignite solid and municipal waste to produce syngas, which is burned to spin turbines and, alas, create renewable electricity. Wheelabrator, the company’s subsidiary, operates 17 WtE facilities in the United States that can convert over 8 million tons of waste into 333 MW each year. That is second only to Covanta, which owns 44 facilities that convert over 20 million tons of waste into 9 million MWh of electricity each year – equivalent to 8% of all renewable energy in the United States.<

See on www.dailyfinance.com

GE Gas Engines to Power Alternative Energy Projects

See on Scoop.itGreen Energy Technologies & Development

GE to Supply Jenbacher J620 Engines to Power GWED’s Waste-to-Energy Projects – […] to power a series of Advanced Recycling and Energy Conversion (AREC) plants that GWE’s development subsidiary, Green Waste Energy Development (GWED), plans to build around the world.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

>GWED uses C6 Technologies’ proprietary and patent-pending, non-burn waste-advanced pyrolysis technology in its AREC projects. The C6 technology can transform a wide range of wastes into “syngas,” which then can be used in gas engines to generate cleaner electricity or produce greener transportation fuels including diesel and jet fuel. C6T licenses its technology to developers worldwide.

Under terms of the agreement, GE will provide GWED with Jenbacher J620 gas engines, which will use the syngas produced at GWED’s waste-gasification facilities to generate renewable electricity. Each installed gas engine will generate nearly 2MWof reliable on-site power. GE also will provide technical support for GWED’s installed engine fleet.<

See on www.onlinetes.com

LONDON, April 25, 2013: Energy from Waste: Modern Plants and Increased Revenues to Boost Investments, says Frost & Sullivan

See on Scoop.itGreen Energy Technologies & Development

/PRNewswire/ — Concerns on the growing volumes of municipal solid waste (MSW), the decreasing capacity of landfill sites, and the considerable rise in resource consumption will help sustain investments in the European waste to energy (WTE) plant…

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

“Waste treatment companies are gradually diverting MSW from landfill sites to use in energy generation owing to regulations on limiting landfills and incentives for lower carbon emissions,” said Frost & Sullivan Energy and Environmental Research Analyst Monika Chrusciak. “The conversion of waste to renewable energy through the application of thermal treatment technologies – increasingly viewed as an attractive solution for waste management – reduces operational costs as well.”

Read more here: http://www.heraldonline.com/2013/04/25/4804660/energy-from-waste-modern-plants.html#storylink=cpy

See on www.heraldonline.com

There’s cash in that trash

See on Scoop.itGreen & Sustainable News

There could be big bucks in waste disposal and management, Bank of America/Merrill Lynch figures.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

Lets look at some of the opportunities BofA/ML has identified:

– Disposal and recycling of municipal solid waste (rubbish, in common parlance) is currently worth $400 billion but over the next decade,  $87 billion in investments are expected in this sector.

– Waste-to-energy (energy recovery from waste): One ton of rubbish can create 500-750 kilowatts of power. This market is worth $7.4 billion in 2013 and  could grow to $81 billion by 2022.

– Sustainable packaging: Accounts for a third of solid waste in developed countries. Worth almost $109 billion in 2011, the market is expected to grow to $178-212 billion by 2015-18.

– e-waste (discarded electrical or electronic devices):  Recycling/reuse of e-waste components was worth $13.9 billion in 2012 but could grow to between $25 and 44.3 billion by 2017-20. One example of how lucrative this can be – -recycling one million mobile phones can recover 24 kg of gold, 250 kg of silver and more than 9,000 kg of copper.

Wastewater and sewage treatment:  The biggest investments are needed in the developing world but in the United States alone, infrastructure of $1 trillion could be needed over the next 25 years, BofA says, citing research from the American Waterworks Association.

See on blogs.reuters.com

Waste fat will power UK’s biggest sewage works | Energy Live News

See on Scoop.itGreen & Sustainable News

Waste fat and oil from restaurants and clogged up drains underground (pictured) will soon power the UK’s largest sewage works. A new power station at Beckton in East London opening …

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

Thames Water says it has agreed to buy 75 GWh of this output to run its Beckton sewage works, which serves roughly 3.5 million people, as well as a nearby desalination plant […]

The water firm has committed to provide the power station with 30 tonnes a day of fat, oil and grease (FOG) enough to fill a six metre-long shipping container. That’s at least half of the fuel the generator needs to run.

Developed and run by ‘green’ utility 2OC, it’s set to produce 130 Gigawatt hours (GWh) a year of renewable electricity – enough to run 39,000 average-sized homes.

See on www.energylivenews.com