It takes money to make money: getting money to flow into energy efficiency projects

Energy in Demand - Sustainable Energy - Rod Janssen

Jim Barrett, Chief Economist, for ACEEE, The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, writes an excellent blog on the ACEEE website about an initiative by the Bank of America to increase investments at the community level.

Bank of America’s Energy Efficiency Financing Program shows path to combining energy savings and community development

If you spend any time with the energy efficiency crowd, you will often hear us call it the lowest cost energy resource out there. What you will never hear us say is that energy efficiency is free. Efficiency can do many great things: It saves money, cuts pollution, increases productivity, and creates jobs. What it can’t do is defy one of the fundamental laws that governs all investments—it takes money to make money.

We want to get money flowing into well-designed energy efficiency projects, especially those that can do the most good where it is the most needed…

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Overly Simple Energy-Economy Models Give Misleading Answers

Does it make a difference if our models of energy and the economy are overly simple? I would argue that it depends on what we plan to use the models for. If all we want to do is determine approximately how many years in the future energy supplies will turn down, then a simple model is perfectly sufficient. But if we want to determine how we might change the current economy to make it hold up better against the forces it is facing, we need a more complex model that explains the economy’s real problems as we reach limits.We need a model that tells the correct shape of the curve, as well as the approximate timing. I suggest reading my recent post regarding complexity and its effects as background for this post.

The common lay interpretation of simple models is that running out of energy supplies can be expected to be our overwhelming problem in the future. A more complete model suggests that our problems as we approach limits are likely to be quite different: growing wealth disparity, inability to maintain complex infrastructure, and growing debt problems.Energy supplies that look easy to extract will not, in fact, be available because prices will not rise high enough. These problems can be expected to change the shape of the curve of future energy consumption to one with a fairly fast decline, such as the Seneca Cliff.

Source: Overly Simple Energy-Economy Models Give Misleading Answers

How Energy Shapes the Economy

In the beginning, the Master Economist created the Economy.  He created businesses large and small, consumers, governments with their regulation, and financial institutions of all types. And the Ma…

world-population-growth

Source: How Energy Shapes the Economy

The Power of the Smart Campus

Smart campus technologies harness the potential to advance everything from productivity to security measures to the operations of the buildings in which students live and study. The United States a…

Source: The Power of the Smart Campus

Why China Is Being Flooded With Oil: Billions In Underwater OPEC Loans Repayable In Crude, by Tyler Durden

“When the price of oil was above $100, many of the less developed oil exporting OPEC members decided to capitalize on the high price and cash out by taking loans using the precious liquid as collateral … However, few oil exporters anticipated such an acute oil plunge in such as short time span, which resulted in the value of the collateral tumbling by 70%, and now find themselves have to repay the original loan by remitting as much as three times more oil!”

STRAIGHT LINE LOGIC

Here’s one of the dumber borrower schemes out there, and a bunch of clueless governments in oil producing countries are at the heart of it: borrow money and agree to pay back the equivalent amount in barrels of oil, not using the market value of oil at the time the deals are struck, but at the time the loans must be repaid. So loans incurred when oil was above $100 a barrel now must be repaid with oil that is only valued at $40-$50 a barrel, meaning debtors must repay 2 to 3 times the amount of oil they would have had oil prices stayed high. The Chinese, the creditor on the other side of these transactions, receive a lot more oil, but they’re running out of storage and refinery capacity. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

When the price of oil was above $100, many of the less developed oil…

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Ski resorts and climate change

Mountain Journal

As climate change bears down on us, winters become ever more erratic. This impacts on the economic viability of ski resorts and the jobs of people who rely on them.  In their quest to remain commercially viable, most ski resorts are adopting the double edged strategy of claiming a space in the ‘green season’ tourism market while also investing in snow making technology. A small number are also showing leadership in terms of grappling with the actual problem of climate change. Sadly, no Australian resorts are in this category.

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Comfort is key in a passive house

0620 home green  Rendering of the home Chris Weissflog, who operates the renewable energy firm Ecogen Energy, is building for his family. Among other green features, its solar panels will meet most of the 3,000-square-foot home’s heating and cooling needs as well as powering a greenhouse with an extended growing season. With story by Patrick Langston.

0620 home green Rendering of the home Chris Weissflog, who operates the renewable energy firm Ecogen Energy, is building for his family. Among other green features, its solar panels will meet most of the 3,000-square-foot home’s heating and cooling needs as well as powering a greenhouse with an extended growing season. With story by Patrick Langston.

>” […] The falling price of technology may still help us out of the quandary. The CHBA is currently developing a net zero and net zero-ready labelling program for home builders and renovators. A net zero home typically uses photovoltaic panels to produce as much energy as it consumes, generally selling excess electricity to the grid. A net zero-ready home is set up for, but does not include, the photovoltaic system.

The CHBA’s Foster says that a net zero home including photovoltaic panels now costs $50,000 to $70,000 more than a conventional home. That’s 50 per cent of the cost of just five years ago, and the price of PV panels continues to drop.

With rising energy prices, the CHBA says the extra monthly mortgage costs associated with a net zero home are now comparable to the savings in energy costs, making it net zero in more ways than one. […]”<

Exploring the Vast Cyber-Space Information Realms of Clearnets and Darknets

Thoughts on Crawling and Understanding the Darknet

Sourced through Scoop.it from: blog.lewman.is

>” […]

Darknets have been around for a decade or so. Some of the most well-known are from the Tor network; Silk Road, Wikileaks, Silk Road 2, StrongBox, and so on. For good or bad, Silk Road is what helped bring darknets to the masses.

The current trend in information security is to try to build insight and intelligence into and from the underground or the darknet. Many companies are focused on the “darknet.” The idea is to learn about what’s below the surface, or near-future attacks or threats, before they affect the normal companies and people of the world. For example, an intelligence agency wants to learn about clandestine operations in its borders, or a financial company wants to learn about attacks on its services and customers before anyone else.

I’m defining the darknet as any services which requires special software to access the service, such as;
1. Tor’s hidden services,
2. I2P,
3. FreeNet, and
4. GnuNet.

There are many more services out there, but in effect they all require special software to access content or services in their own address space.

Most darknet systems are really overlay networks on top of TCP/IP, or UDP/IP. The goal is to create a different addressing system than simply using IP addresses (of either v4 or v6 flavor).XMPP could also be considered an overlay network, but not a darknet, for example. XMPP shouldn’t be considered a darknet because it relies heavily on public IPv4/IPv6 addressing to function. It’s also trivial to learn detailed metadata about conversations from either watching an XMPP stream, or XMPP server.

The vastness of address spaces

Let’s expand on address space. In the “clearnet” we have IP addresses of two flavors, IPv4 and IPv6. Most people are familiar with IPv4, the classic xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx address. IPv6 addresses are long in order to create a vast address space for the world to use, for say, the Internet of Things, or a few trillion devices all online at once. IPv6 is actually fun and fantastic, especially when paired with IPSec, but this is a topic for another post. IPv4 address space is 32-bit large, or roughly 4.3 billion addresses. IPv6 address space is 128-bits large, or trillions on trillions of addresses. There are some quirks to IPv4 which let us use more than 4.3 billion addresses, but the scale of the spaces is what we care about most. IPv6 is vastly larger. Overlay networks are built to create, or use, different properties of an address space. Rather than going to a global governing body and asking for a slice of the space to call your own, an overlay network can let you do that without a central authority, in general.

Defining darknets

There are other definitions or nomenclature for darknets, such as the deep web:

noun 1. the portion of the Internet that is hidden from conventional search engines, as by encryption; the aggregate of unindexed websites: private databases and other unlinked content on the deep web.

Basically, the content you won’t find on Google, Bing, or Yahoo no matter how advanced your search prowess.

How big is the darknet?

No one knows how large is the darknet. By definition, it’s not easy to find services or content. However, there are a number of people working to figure out the scope, size, and to further classify content found on it. There are a few amateur sites trying to index various darknets; such as Ahmia, and others only reachable with darknet software. There are some researchers working on the topic as well, see Dr. Owen’s video presentation, Tor: Hidden Services and Deanonymisation. A public example is DARPA MEMEX. Their open catalog of tools is a fine starting point. […]”<

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