Water Waste, Leaking Pipes and Infrastructure Maintenance

Imagine Manhattan under 300 feet of water, not from a flood or rising sea level, but from the 2.1 trillion gallons of water lost from leaky pipes every year. That is nearly 6 billion gallons a day! The majority of leaks are a result of old infrastructure, pressure changes in the water mains, and small household leaks.

Source: theenergycollective.com

>”[…] Infrastructure leaks

About 14-18% of water treated in the United States is wasted through aging and damaged infrastructure, as well as faulty meters. The American Society of Civil Engineers recently gave the US a “D” grade for water infrastructure. Let’s take a look at a few cities around the US.

Chicago wastes about 22 billion gallons of treated water a year, enough to serve 700,000 individual needs for a whole year.The state of California loses about 228 billion gallons a year, which is more than the city of LA uses in a year. On average the state loses 49 gallons a day for every service connection, and Sacramento loses a whopping 135 gallons per connection.In 2013 San Francisco experienced over 100 water main breaks and New York averages over 400 a year.Houston lost 22 billion gallons of water in 2013, 15% of its total water supplyAccording to the EPA we lose about 34 billion gallons of drinking water a day in the United States, about 1/6 of public water systems supply.

Household water waste

Average household leaks can add up to over 10,000 gallons of water a year, enough water to wash 270 loads of laundry. Nationally, household water waste totals over a trillion gallons – or the equivalent of 11 million households’ yearly usage. The most common types of leaks at the household level are worn toilet flappers, dripping faucets, and leaky showerheads. 10% of US homes waste over 90 gallons a day just from these small fixtures. Here are some quick facts:

  • Faucets: 1 drip/second adds up to over 3,000 gallons a year (you can take 180 showers with that water!)
  • a showerhead leaking at 10 drips/minute wastes over 500 gallons a year (that’s 60 loads of dishes)
  • Old inefficient toilets can water up to 13,000 gallons a year
  • Irrigation leaks just the size of a dime will waste nearly 6,300 gallons a month

[…] Fixing easy leaks can save about 10% on your monthly water bill. Replacing that old toilet with a new efficient toilet could save you upwards of $2,400 over the toilet’s lifetime. […]”<

See on Scoop.itGreen & Sustainable News

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Qualifications and Documents for Comprehensive Reserve Fund Studies

See on Scoop.itGreen Building Operations – Systems & Controls, Maintenance & Commissioning

As of May 5, 2001, the Condominium Act 1998 requires all existing and new condominium corporations to have a “Reserve Fund Study” undertaken. This article outlines some of the key aspects of Reserve Funds and the Studies.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

>[…]The regulations to the Condominium Act stipulate the minimum liability insurance requirements; $1,000,000.

6. What Information Does The Corporation Need To Provide?

Once you have hired a consultant, he/she will require information about the condominium corporation. This will include the following:

  • As-built drawings and specifications.
  • The Declaration and Description.
  • Reciprocal cost sharing agreements.
  • Previous reserve fund studies.
  • The most recent audited financial statements.
  • What the current annual contribution to the Reserve Fund is.
  • Repairs or replacements to the common elements that have already been completed and when.
  • Similarly, scheduled future work needs to be accounted for.
  • A summary of problems being encountered by the Corporation that should be reviewed.
  • As an example, water penetration concerns.

7. What Is The Process?

The process is as follows:

  • The consultant is provided the above information. One of the most important are the drawings. They will be reviewed prior to visiting the site in order for the consultant to become familiar with the overall design and construction schemes.
  • Site inspection. In order to have an understanding on the current condition of the common elements, visual inspections are undertaken. Problem areas noted above can be reviewed. After the first study, the next study update can be completed without a site inspection. The next update must include a site inspection.
  • The report is then prepared (see next question). The drawings are used to “take-off” quantities such as roofing, exterior wall cladding, asphalt, hallway finishes etc that will assist in preparing the replacement/repair cost budgets. It is recommended that a draft report should be submitted in order for the Board and Property Manager to review it prior to it being finalized. The consultant should be available to attend a meeting to review the report.
  • Upon receiving direction from the Board of Directors, the Reserve Fund Study is finalized and submitted. […] 

See on www.maytower.ca

DIY Reserve Study Site Launched

See on Scoop.itGreen Building Operations – Systems & Controls, Maintenance & Commissioning

CALABASAS, Calif., Oct. 24, 2013 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — Association Reserves, a well-known provider of reserve study services in the United States, recently announced its decision to launch a new website dedicated to their Do-it-Yourself Reserve Study kit.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

>According to an article written using data from Association Reserves’ 30,000 reserve studies, 70 percent of associations in the United States are “underfunded.” This puts many organizations at an increased risk of special assessments, deferred maintenance, declining property values, and board member liability. According to the company, by accounting for the ongoing cost of common area deterioration and then properly funding reserves, boards are able to responsibly prepare for their associations’ future expenses.

“Our goal is to eliminate all excuses for board members not to be aware of the current strength of their Association’s reserve fund and the funding plan necessary to perform common area repairs & replacement in a timely manner,” says Robert Nordlund, PE, RS, the company’s founder. “The path from underfunded to appropriately-funded is a journey and a Reserve Study provides the necessary road map.”<

See on www.prnewswire.com

Robotic Technologies Applied to Solar Energy Market – Installation and Maintenance

See on Scoop.itGreen Building Design – Architecture & Engineering

Mountain View CA (SPX) Sep 20, 2013 – … robotic technologies deliver revolutionary installation and cleaning services at highly competitive prices … for building and maintenance of utility-scale solar plants..

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

>The typical installation process for utility-scale projects is similar to that of a small-scale, 20-panel, residential installation. Despite incremental improvements to the process, a 200,000-panel installation has retained many of the characteristics of a 20-panel installation.

They are both labor-intensive, and require repetitive bolt-tightening and glass-hauling. While these are minor flaws in a 20-panel system, they create significant inefficiencies in 20,000- or 200,000-panel systems.

Alion Energy has plugged the shortcomings of the current installation methods by changing the materials and design used in the mounting structure as well as by automating the installation. By combining robotic installation technology with established construction practices, Alion Energy has built a system twice as fast and 75 percent more labor-efficient that lowers solar electricity’s levelized cost of energy (LCOE) to compete with traditional energy sources.<

See on www.solardaily.com