“Personal Wipes” create toxic waste in Canadian sewers

See on Scoop.itGreen & Sustainable News

They’re billed as a fresh, clean alternative to toilet paper – but waste-water utilities across Canada say personal wipes are creating putrid sewage clogs that are costing Canadian ratepayers at least $250 million a year.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

>MESUG members have set up traps across Ontario municipalities, Orr said, and they’re catching hundreds of flushable wipes. The situation is the same across the country, with officials in Penticton, B.C., recently complaining publicly about the wipes.

Canadian utilities aren’t alone in their battle against personal wipes.

In the U.S. capital region, the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission has spent more than $1 million installing powerful grinders to shred wipes before they reach pumps on their way to treatment plants.

The utility has also devoted hundreds of man-hours to unclog pipes and repair broken sewer lines. It blames wipes for blockages that have caused sewage to overflow into streams or back up into residential basements.<

See on globalnews.ca

Qualifications and Documents for Comprehensive Reserve Fund Studies

See on Scoop.itGreen Building Operations – Systems & Controls, Maintenance & Commissioning

As of May 5, 2001, the Condominium Act 1998 requires all existing and new condominium corporations to have a “Reserve Fund Study” undertaken. This article outlines some of the key aspects of Reserve Funds and the Studies.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

>[…]The regulations to the Condominium Act stipulate the minimum liability insurance requirements; $1,000,000.

6. What Information Does The Corporation Need To Provide?

Once you have hired a consultant, he/she will require information about the condominium corporation. This will include the following:

  • As-built drawings and specifications.
  • The Declaration and Description.
  • Reciprocal cost sharing agreements.
  • Previous reserve fund studies.
  • The most recent audited financial statements.
  • What the current annual contribution to the Reserve Fund is.
  • Repairs or replacements to the common elements that have already been completed and when.
  • Similarly, scheduled future work needs to be accounted for.
  • A summary of problems being encountered by the Corporation that should be reviewed.
  • As an example, water penetration concerns.

7. What Is The Process?

The process is as follows:

  • The consultant is provided the above information. One of the most important are the drawings. They will be reviewed prior to visiting the site in order for the consultant to become familiar with the overall design and construction schemes.
  • Site inspection. In order to have an understanding on the current condition of the common elements, visual inspections are undertaken. Problem areas noted above can be reviewed. After the first study, the next study update can be completed without a site inspection. The next update must include a site inspection.
  • The report is then prepared (see next question). The drawings are used to “take-off” quantities such as roofing, exterior wall cladding, asphalt, hallway finishes etc that will assist in preparing the replacement/repair cost budgets. It is recommended that a draft report should be submitted in order for the Board and Property Manager to review it prior to it being finalized. The consultant should be available to attend a meeting to review the report.
  • Upon receiving direction from the Board of Directors, the Reserve Fund Study is finalized and submitted. […] 

See on www.maytower.ca

DIY Reserve Study Site Launched

See on Scoop.itGreen Building Operations – Systems & Controls, Maintenance & Commissioning

CALABASAS, Calif., Oct. 24, 2013 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — Association Reserves, a well-known provider of reserve study services in the United States, recently announced its decision to launch a new website dedicated to their Do-it-Yourself Reserve Study kit.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

>According to an article written using data from Association Reserves’ 30,000 reserve studies, 70 percent of associations in the United States are “underfunded.” This puts many organizations at an increased risk of special assessments, deferred maintenance, declining property values, and board member liability. According to the company, by accounting for the ongoing cost of common area deterioration and then properly funding reserves, boards are able to responsibly prepare for their associations’ future expenses.

“Our goal is to eliminate all excuses for board members not to be aware of the current strength of their Association’s reserve fund and the funding plan necessary to perform common area repairs & replacement in a timely manner,” says Robert Nordlund, PE, RS, the company’s founder. “The path from underfunded to appropriately-funded is a journey and a Reserve Study provides the necessary road map.”<

See on www.prnewswire.com