More Major Companies Embrace New Recycling Label | Ethical Consumption

See on Scoop.itGreen & Sustainable News

A dozen major U.S. companies, including General Mills (NYSE:GIS), Kellogg’s (NYSE:K), Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT) and REI, have already joined the labeling scheme. Since launching last January, How2Recycle has established itself as the only labeling system that convey recyclability across all material types and provides explicit directions to consumers to influence their recycling behavior.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

“Consumers are faced with a confusing landscape of material and recycling messages that are often inconsistent or misleading. We believe this label will help consumers and companies more effectively communicate recyclability and contribute to more successful resource recovery,” said Anne Bedarf, who led the development of the label, at a launch ceremony for How2Recycle last year.

“As we enable consumers to recycle correctly, we ensure more quality recycled material is available for us to use, our consumers send less waste to landfill, and we can reduce the energy needed to create new packages,” added Lorio, whose company was recently named one of the “Global 100 Most Sustainable Corporations in the World” by Corporate Knights.

See on www.justmeans.com

New Study Shows 5 Factors Push Social Behavior and Not So-Called Influencers – Are Kred and Klout Wrong?

See on Scoop.itTwitter & Social Media

Social influence is driven by 5 factors: message type, message form, device, time, and user engagement, according to new research by Lucule Consulting. So are you still counting on finding people with high “influence scores?

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

Indexes like Klout and Kred that are trying to prop up that idea are desperately trying to retro-fit more and more sources of social data to keep, well, their cred intact.  But according to Pente they have the problem exactly backwards: it’s not the “influencer” who changes behavior, it’s much more about the message–and the recipient.

Their statistical analysis indicates that the influence score accounted for only 3% of the variation in response. […]

Instead, consumers are more prone to react positively if a relevant message is received in a certain format (“News you Can Use,” for example) at certain times of the day when the level of engagement with a particular device is optimal (smart phones during the day, tablets in the evenings.)

We want to leave the idea of “sender” as influence,” says Klepic. “The mere fact that someone sends a message is too simplistic in social media. Just cause a message goes out in the “ether” doesn’t mean it has any impact at all. It is just broadcast.”

See on socialmediatoday.com