Energy Efficiency – Modems, routers & black boxes

See on Scoop.itGreen Energy Technologies & Development

Your high-speed modem and router—those little blinking boxes that you use to stream video and get email—could be eating up as much energy as your TV, and twice as much as your laptop. What a waste.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

How much energy does your cable modem consume?  Have you ever over-heated a router?

>At NRDC, we’ve worked with industry and government to help make home electronics more energy efficient, saving money for consumers and reducing carbon pollution from power plants. While we’ve made progress on cutting energy waste from televisions, computers, gaming systems and power supplies, until now, no one had looked at the energy use of devices like modems and routers.

It’s a good thing we did. There are 145 million of these small network devices in U.S. households. These seemingly insignificant little boxes are always on—and they consume more than $1 billion and 3 dirty coal power plants’ worth of electricity each year, according to a new analysis released by NRDC. […]<

See on theenergycollective.com

Is IT an Agent of Mass Extinction?

See on Scoop.itGreen Energy Technologies & Development

Enterprise architecture that automated decades ago must deal with new requirements and manage existing complexity, or face extinction

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

One of the first aspects of complexity in mature enterprises that comes to mind is what philosopher R. G. Collingwood called “the law of primitive survivals.” This states that earlier, more primitive forms of things coexist with later, more sophisticated forms of things. We see this in biology, where primitive forms, like sharks, exist with modern forms, like bony fishes, and algae coexist with flowering plants. The primitive coexists with the modern to a surprising extent. …

What is Complexity?

The complexity of information, technology and application architectures in mature enterprises seems to take the form of the survival of previous generations of environments integrated with overlays of more modern generations. …

Evolution and Extinction

Large, mature enterprises have seen mainframes, PCs, distributed processing, the Internet, the cloud and are now in the early stages of another revolution: big data. How much more complexity can be added to their environments? I have tried looking for answers in evolutionary science, which I studied at university; the field teaches that specialization typically leads to the inability to adapt to changing circumstances. …

See on www.information-management.com

Boulder’s Smart Grid Leaves Citizens in the Dark : Greentech Media

See on Scoop.itGreen Energy Technologies & Development

Utilities have to engage with consumers and businesses to make the smart grid work.

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

“I had a smart meter, but I didn’t even know I had a smart meter,” said Dick.

Dick and a team of CU engineers are working on exactly this problem: how to inform people about their electricity use. The team is creating an online system called “EMPIRE” — EMpowering People In Reducing Energy consumption.  […]

Huston said that because Boulder’s smart grid was one of the first in the country, some of the technologies it used, such as fiber optic communication technology, turned out to be less ideal than hoped. The new two-way communication technology, installing smart meters for less than a quarter of the population and other features almost doubled the project’s cost within a year after it began. As of October 2012, the total costs were pushing $45 million.

See on www.greentechmedia.com

Day after patch, Java zero-day sold to highest bidders

See on Scoop.itGreen Energy Technologies & Development

With exploit sold for $5,000 via cybercrime forum, experts double down on calls for consumers to uninstall the software

Duane Tilden‘s insight:

“Java is fundamentally broken because it is built upon a broken promise: That it runs in a protected sandbox which somehow protects the user,” Krebs told CSO Online on Wednesday.

Sunday’s patch was an effort to quiet a firestorm of criticism and calls not only from a majority of security experts but even the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) for consumers to disable Java on their PCs.

This latest report intensified some of those calls, but also a bit of pushback, although not in the form of any major defense of Oracle. Simon Crosby, […] banning or disabling Java would not solve the problem. “Humans develop buggy code — […] they can all be subverted,” he wrote. “Moreover, many users (and businesses) depend on Java … banning it would severely impact my ability to work.”

Crosby wrote that “micro-virtualization” can solve the problem with Java and other insecure applications with “hardware isolation to enforce ‘need to know’ on a per-task basis on the endpoint.”

See on www.networkworld.com